Kod skripte: /srv/disk16/3266814/www/phporacle.eu5.net/fwphp/glomodul/mkd/02/02_domain_model/DM_Gervasio_part2.txt šđčćž
Kod skripte /home/www/phporacle.eu5.net/zinc/showsource.php koja prikazuje kod (za vlastiti kod ne slati joj param. "file=...", ne inkludira se view_fn.inc)
   1 
   2 
   3 
   4 
   5 
   6 
   7 
   8 
   9 
  10 
  11 
  12 
  13 
  14 
  15 
  16 
  17 
  18 
  19 
  20 
  21 
  22 
  23 
  24 
  25 
  26 
  27 
  28 
  29 
  30 
  31 
  32 
  33 
  34 
  35 
  36 
  37 
  38 
  39 
  40 
  41 
  42 
  43 
  44 
  45 
  46 
  47 
  48 
  49 
  50 
  51 
  52 
  53 
  54 
  55 
  56 
  57 
  58 
  59 
  60 
  61 
  62 
  63 
  64 
  65 
  66 
  67 
  68 
  69 
  70 
  71 
  72 
  73 
  74 
  75 
  76 
  77 
  78 
  79 
  80 
  81 
  82 
  83 
  84 
  85 
  86 
  87 
  88 
  89 
  90 
  91 
  92 
  93 
  94 
  95 
  96 
  97 
  98 
  99 
 100 
 101 
 102 
 103 
 104 
 105 
 106 
 107 
 108 
 109 
 110 
 111 
 112 
 113 
 114 
 115 
 116 
 117 
 118 
 119 
 120 
 121 
 122 
 123 
 124 
 125 
 126 
 127 
 128 
 129 
 130 
 131 
 132 
 133 
 134 
 135 
 136 
 137 
 138 
 139 
 140 
 141 
 142 
 143 
 144 
 145 
 146 
 147 
 148 
 149 
 150 
 151 
 152 
 153 
 154 
 155 
 156 
 157 
 158 
 159 
 160 
 161 
 162 
 163 
 164 
 165 
 166 
 167 
 168 
 169 
 170 
 171 
 172 
 173 
 174 
 175 
 176 
 177 
 178 
 179 
 180 
 181 
 182 
 183 
 184 
 185 
 186 
 187 
 188 
 189 
 190 
 191 
 192 
 193 
 194 
 195 
 196 
 197 
 198 
 199 
 200 
 201 
 202 
 203 
 204 
 205 
 206 
 207 
 208 
 209 
 210 
 211 
 212 
 213 
 214 
 215 
 216 
 217 
 218 
 219 
 220 
 221 
 222 
 223 
 224 
 225 
 226 
 227 
 228 
 229 
 230 
 231 
 232 
 233 
 234 
 235 
 236 
 237 
 238 
 239 
 240 
 241 
 242 
 243 
 244 
 245 
 246 
 247 
 248 
 249 
 250 
 251 
 252 
 253 
 254 
 255 
 256 
 257 
 258 
 259 
 260 
 261 
 262 
 263 
 264 
 265 
 266 
 267 
 268 
 269 
 270 
 271 
 272 
 273 
 274 
 275 
 276 
 277 
 278 
 279 
 280 
 281 
 282 
 283 
 284 
 285 
 286 
 287 
 288 
 289 
 290 
 291 
 292 
 293 
 294 
 295 
 296 
 297 
 298 
 299 
 300 
 301 
 302 
 303 
 304 
 305 
 306 
 307 
 308 
 309 
 310 
 311 
 312 
 313 
 314 
 315 
 316 
 317 
 318 
 319 
 320 
 321 
 322 
 323 
 324 
 325 
 326 
 327 
 328 
 329 
 330 
 331 
 332 
 333 
 334 
 335 
 336 
 337 
 338 
 339 
 340 
 341 
 342 
 343 
 344 
 345 
 346 
 347 
 348 
 349 
 350 
 351 
 352 
 353 
 354 
 355 
 356 
 357 
 358 
 359 
 360 
 361 
 362 
 363 
 364 
 365 
 366 
 367 
 368 
 369 
 370 
 371 
 372 
 373 
 374 
 375 
 376 
 377 
 378 
 379 
 380 
 381 
 382 
 383 
 384 
 385 
 386 
 387 
 388 
 389 
 390 
 391 
 392 
 393 
 394 
 395 
 396 
 397 
 398 
 399 
 400 
 401 
 402 
 403 
 404 
 405 
 406 
 407 
 408 
 409 
 410 
 411 
 412 
 413 
 414 
 415 
 416 
 417 
 418 
 419 
 420 
 421 
 422 
 423 
 424 
 425 
 426 
 427 
 428 
 429 
 430 
 431 
 432 
 433 
 434 
 435 
 436 
 437 
 438 
 439 
 440 
 441 
 442 
 443 
 444 
 445 
 446 
 447 
 448 
 449 
 450 
 451 
 452 
 453 
 454 
 455 
 456 
 457 
 458 
 459 
 460 
 461 
 462 
 463 
 464 
 465 
 466 
 467 
 468 
 469 
 470 
 471 
 472 
 473 
 474 
 475 
 476 
 477 
 478 
 479 
 480 
 481 
 482 
 483 
 484 
 485 
 486 
 487 
 488 
 489 
 490 
 491 
 492 
 493 
 494 
 495 
 496 
 497 
 498 
 499 
 500 
 501 
 502 
 503 
 504 
 505 
 506 
 507 
 508 
 509 
 510 
 511 
 512 
 513 
 514 
 515 
 516 
 517 
 518 
 519 
 520 
 521 
 522 
 523 
 524 
 525 
 526 
 527 
 528 
 529 
 530 
 531 
 532 
 533 
 534 
 535 
 536 
 537 
 538 
 539 
 540 
 541 
 542 
 543 
 544 
 545 
 546 
 547 
 548 
 549 
 550 
 551 
 552 
 553 
 554 
 555 
 556 
 557 
 558 
 559 
 560 
 561 
 562 
 563 
 564 
 565 
 566 
 567 
 568 
 569 
 570 
 571 
 572 
 573 
 574 
 575 
 576 
 577 
 578 
 579 
 580 
 581 
 582 
 583 
 584 
 585 
 586 
 587 
 588 
 589 
 590 
 591 
 592 
 593 
 594 
 595 
 596 
 597 
 598 
 599 
 600 
 601 
 602 
 603 
 604 
 605 
 606 
 607 
 608 
 609 
 610 
 611 
 612 
 613 
 614 
 615 
 616 
 617 
 618 
 619 
 620 
 621 
 622 
 623 
 624 
 625 
 626 
 627 
 628 
 629 
 630 
 631 
 632 
 633 
 634 
 635 
 636 
 637 
 638 
 639 
 640 
 641 
 642 
 643 
 644 
 645 
 646 
 647 
  <?php ---- for code coloring
 1.  
[PHP](https://www.sitepoint.com/php/)
 
2.  March 162012
 3.  https
://www.sitepoint.com/integrating-the-data-mappers/
     
By [Alejandro Gervasio](https://www.sitepoint.com/author/agervasio/)
 
 ## Building a Domain Model - Integrating Data Mappers
 
 
**See DDL at end this article**.
 
 While 
there iss still a huge number of cases where [Domain Models](http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/domainModel.html) are considered an overkill "enterprisey" solution that does not jive with the natural pragmatism that proliferates throughout the world of PHP, they are steadily breaching the minds of many developers, even of those who cling to the Database Model paradigm like the last life jacket of a sinking ship.
 
 
There are some reasons that largely justify such a reactionAfter allbuilding even the simplest Domain Model demands definition of the constraintsrules, and relationships among its building objectshow they will behave in a given context, and what type of data they will carry during their life cyclePlusthe process of transferring model data to and from the storage will likely require to drop a set of [Data Mappers](http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/dataMapper.html) at some point, a fact that highlights why Domain Models are often surrounded by a cloud of bullying.
 
 
Eager prejudgements tend to be misleadingthoughThe bones of a rich Domain Model will certainly be accommodated more comfortably inside the boundaries of a large applicationbut it is possible to scale them down and get the most from them in smaller environments tooTo demonstrate thisin [my previous article](http://www.sitepoint.com/building-a-domain-model/) I showed you how to implement a simple blog domain model composed of a few posts, comments, and user objects.
 
 
The previous article lacked a true happy endingit merely showed the mechanics of the modelnot how to put it to work in synchrony with a "real" persistence layerSo before you throw me to the lions for such an impolite attitudein this follow-up we will be developing a basic mapping module which will allow you to move data easily between the blogs model and a MySQL databaseall while keeping them neatly isolated from one other.
 
 
## Building a Naive DAL (or why my PDO adapter is better than yours)
 
 
The phrase may sound like an cheap clicheI knowbut I am not particularly interested in reinventing the wheel each time I tackle a software problem (unless I need a nicer and faster wheelof course). In this case, the situation does warrant some additional effort considering we will be trying to connect a batch of mapping classes to a blogs domain modelGiven the magnitude of the endeavorthe idea is to set up from scratch a basic Data Access Layer (DALso that domain objects can easily be persisted in a MySQL database, and in turnretrieved on request through some generic finders.
 
 
The DAL in question will be made up of just a couple of componentsthe first one will be a simple database adapter interface, whose contract looks like this:
 
 
### 1. DatabaseAdapterInterface.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace LibraryDatabase;
 
 interface DatabaseAdapterInterface
 {
     public function connect();
     public function disconnect();
     
     public function prepare(
$sql, array $options = array());
     public function execute(array 
$parameters = array());
 
     // C R U D :
     public function fetch(
$fetchStyle = null, 
         
$cursorOrientation = null, $cursorOffset = null);
     public function fetchAll(
$fetchStyle = null, $column = 0);
     public function select(
$table, array $bind$boolOperator = "AND");
     public function insert(
$table, array $bind);
     public function update(
$table, array $bind$where = "");
     public function delete(
$table$where = "");
 }
 
```
 
 
Undeniablythe above `DatabaseAdapterInterfaceis a tameable creatureIts contract allows us to create different database adapters at runtime and perform a few common taskssuch as connecting to the database and running CRUD operations without much fuss.
 
 
Now we need at least one implementer of the interface that does all these cool thingsThe proud cavalier that will assume this responsibility will be a non-canonical PDO adapterwhich looks as follows:
 
 
### 2. PdoAdapter.php - Admin_crud.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace LibraryDatabase;
 
 class PdoAdapter implements DatabaseAdapterInterface
 {
     protected 
$config = array();
     protected 
$connection;
     protected 
$statement;
     protected 
$fetchMode = PDO::FETCH_ASSOC;   
     
     public function __construct(
$dsn$username = null,
         
$password = null, array $driverOptions = array()) {
         
$this->config = compact("dsn", "username", "password", 
             "driverOptions");
     }
 
     public function getStatement() {
         if (
$this->statement === null) {
             throw new PDOException(
               "There is no PDOStatement object for use.");
         } 
         return 
$this->statement;
     }
     
     public function connect() {
         // if there is a PDO object already, return early
         if (
$this->connection) {
             return;
         }
  
         try {
             
$this->connection = new PDO(
                 
$this->config["dsn"],
                 
$this->config["username"],
                 
$this->config["password"],
                 
$this->config["driverOptions"]);
             
$this->connection->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE,
                 PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
             
$this->connection->setAttribute(
                 PDO::ATTR_EMULATE_PREPARES, false); 
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
     
     public function disconnect() {
         
$this->connection = null;
     }
     
     public function prepare(
$sql, array $options = array() {
         
$this->connect();
         try {
             
$this->statement = $this->connection->prepare($sql
                 
$options);
             return 
$this;
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
     
     public function execute(array 
$parameters = array()) {
         try {
             
$this->getStatement()->execute($parameters);
             return 
$this;
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
     
     public function countAffectedRows() {
         try {
             return 
$this->getStatement()->rowCount();
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
 
     public function getLastInsertId(
$name = null) {
         
$this->connect();
         return 
$this->connection->lastInsertId($name);
     }
     
     public function fetch(
$fetchStyle = null,
         
$cursorOrientation = null, $cursorOffset = null) {
         if (
$fetchStyle === null) {
             
$fetchStyle = $this->fetchMode;
         }
  
         try {
             return 
$this->getStatement()->fetch($fetchStyle
                 
$cursorOrientation$cursorOffset);
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
      
     public function fetchAll(
$fetchStyle = null, $column = 0) {
         if (
$fetchStyle === null) {
             
$fetchStyle = $this->fetchMode;
         }
  
         try {
             return 
$fetchStyle === PDO::FETCH_COLUMN
                ? 
$this->getStatement()->fetchAll($fetchStyle$column)
                : 
$this->getStatement()->fetchAll($fetchStyle);
         }
         catch (PDOException 
$e) {
             throw new RunTimeException(
$e->getMessage());
         }
     }
     
     public function select(
$table, array $bind = array(), 
         
$boolOperator = "AND") {
         if (
$bind) {
             
$where = array();
             foreach (
$bind as $col => $value) {
                 unset(
$bind[$col]);
                 
$bind[":" . $col] = $value;
                 
$where[] = $col . " = :" . $col;
             }
         }
  
         
$sql = "SELECT * FROM " . $table
             . ((
$bind) ? " WHERE "
             . implode(" " . 
$boolOperator . " ", $where) : " ");
         
$this->prepare($sql)
             ->execute(
$bind);
         return 
$this;
     }
     
     public function insert(
$table, array $bind) {
         
$cols = implode(", ", array_keys($bind));
         
$values = implode(", :", array_keys($bind));
         foreach (
$bind as $col => $value) {
             unset(
$bind[$col]);
             
$bind[":" . $col] = $value;
         }
  
         
$sql = "INSERT INTO " . $table
             . " (" . 
$cols . ")  VALUES (:" . $values . ")";
         return (int) 
$this->prepare($sql)
             ->execute(
$bind)
             ->getLastInsertId();
     }
     
     public function update(
$table, array $bind$where = "") {
         
$set = array();
         foreach (
$bind as $col => $value) {
             unset(
$bind[$col]);
             
$bind[":" . $col] = $value;
             
$set[] = $col . " = :" . $col;
         }
  
         
$sql = "UPDATE " . $table . " SET " . implode(", ", $set)
             . ((
$where) ? " WHERE " . $where : " ");
         return 
$this->prepare($sql)
             ->execute(
$bind)
             ->countAffectedRows();
     }
     
     public function delete(
$table$where = "") {
         
$sql = "DELETE FROM " . $table . (($where) ? " WHERE " . $where : " ");
         return 
$this->prepare($sql)
             ->execute()
             ->countAffectedRows();
     }
 }
 
```
 
 
Fat code snippetbut it is necessary evilWhat is moreeven while PdoAdapter class looks somewhat tangled (knottyconfused massHighly complex), it is actually a simple wrapper which exploits much of the functionality that PDO offers right out the box without exposing client code to a verbose API.
 
 
At this point we have implemented a simple DAL which we can use for persisting the blogs domain model in MySQL without sweating too much during the processNow we need to add the middle men to the picturethat is the aforementioned data mappersso any impedance mismatches can be handled quietly behind the scenes.
 
 
## Implementing a Bi-directional Mapping Layer
 
 
It depends on the context of coursebut most of the time building a mapping layer (and specifically a bi-directional relational oneis quite a ways away from being trivialThe process doesn not boil down to just say... heyI will get these relational mappers up and running during a coffee break. That is why ORM libraries like [Doctrine](http://www.doctrine-project.org/) live and breathe after all. In this case, however, we want to leverage the bold coder living inside of us and create our own set of mappers to l massage the blogs domain objects without facing the learning curve of a third-party package.
 
 
Let us begin with encapsulating as much mapping logic as possible [within an abstract class](http://martinfowler.com/refactoring/catalog/extractSuperclass.html), like the below one:
 
 
window.propertag.cmd.push(function() { proper\_display('sitepoint\_content\_1'); });
 
 
### 3. AbstractDataMapper.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use LibraryDatabase DatabaseAdapterInterface;
 
 abstract class AbstractDataMapper
 {
     protected 
$adapter;
     protected 
$entityTable;
 
     public function __construct(DatabaseAdapterInterface 
$adapter) {
         
$this->adapter = $adapter;
     }
 
     public function getAdapter() {
         return 
$this->adapter;
     }
 
     public function findById(
$id)
     {
         
$this->adapter->select($this->entityTable,
             array('id' => 
$id));
 
         if (!
$row = $this->adapter->fetch()) {
             return null;
         }
 
         return 
$this->createEntity($row);
     }
 
     public function findAll(array 
$conditions = array())
     {
         
$entities = array();
         
$this->adapter->select($this->entityTable$conditions);
         
$rows = $this->adapter->fetchAll();
 
         if (
$rows) {
             foreach (
$rows as $row) {
                 
$entities[] = $this->createEntity($row);
             }
         }
 
         return 
$entities;
     }
 
     // Create an entity (IMPLEMENTATION DELEGATED TO CONCRETE MAPPERS)
     abstract protected function createEntity(array 
$row);
 }
 
```
 
 
The class abstracts away behind a couple of generic finders all of the logic required for pulling in data from a specified tablewhich is then used for reconstituting domain objects in a valid stateBecause reconstitutions should be delegated down the hierarchy to refined implementationsthe `createEntity()method has been declared abstract.
 
 
Let's now define the set of concrete mappers that will deal with blog posts, comments, and users. Here's the first onealong with the interface it implements:
 
 
### 4. PostMapperInterface.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use ModelPostInterface;
 
 interface PostMapperInterface
 {
    public function findById(
$id);
    public function findAll(array 
$conditions = array());
 
    public function insert(PostInterface 
$post);
    public function delete(
$id);
 }
 
```
 
 
### 5. PostMapper.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use LibraryDatabaseDatabaseAdapterInterface,
     ModelPostInterface,
     ModelPost;
 
 class PostMapper extends AbstractDataMapper implements PostMapperInterface
 {
     protected 
$commentMapper;
     protected 
$entityTable = "posts";
 
     public function __construct(DatabaseAdapterInterface 
$adapter,
         CommentMapperInterface 
$commenMapper) {
         
$this->commentMapper = $commenMapper;
         parent::__construct(
$adapter);
     }
 
     public function insert(PostInterface 
$post) {
         
$post->id = $this->adapter->insert($this->entityTable,
             array("title"   => 
$post->title,
                   "content" => 
$post->content));
         return 
$post->id;
     }
 
     public function delete(
$id) {
         if (
$id instanceof PostInterface) {
             
$id = $id->id;
         }
 
         
$this->adapter->delete($this->entityTable, "id = $id");
         return 
$this->commentMapper->delete("post_id = $id");
     }
 
     protected function createEntity(array 
$row) {
         
$comments = $this->commentMapper->findAll(
             array("post_id" => 
$row["id"]));
         return new Post(
$row["title"]$row["content"]$comments);
     }
 }
 
```
 
 
Notice that the implementation of `PostMapperfollows a fairly logical pathSimply putnot only does it extend its abstract parentbut it injects in the constructor a comment mapper (still undefined), in order to handle in sync both posts and comments without revealing to the outside world the complexities of creating the whole object graphOf coursewe shouldn't deny ourselves the joy of seeing how the still veiled comment mapper looks, hence here's its source codecoupled to the corresponding interface:
 
 
### 6. CommentMapperInterface.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use ModelCommentInterface;
 
 interface CommentMapperInterface
 {
     public function findById(
$id);
     public function findAll(array 
$conditions = array());
 
     public function insert(CommentInterface 
$comment$postId,
         
$userId);
     public function delete(
$id);
 }
 
```
 
 
### 7. CommentMapperInterface.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use LibraryDatabaseDatabaseAdapterInterface,
     ModelCommentInterface,
     ModelComment;
 
 class CommentMapper extends AbstractDataMapper implements CommentMapperInterface
 {
     protected 
$userMapper;
     protected 
$entityTable = "comments";
 
     public function __construct(DatabaseAdapterInterface 
$adapter,
         UserMapperInterface 
$userMapper) {
         
$this->userMapper = $userMapper;
         parent::__construct(
$adapter);
     }
 
     public function insert(CommentInterface 
$comment$postId
         
$userId) {
         
$comment->id = $this->adapter->insert($this->entityTable
             array("content" => 
$comment->content,
                   "post_id" => 
$postId,
                   "user_id" => 
$userId));
         return 
$comment->id;
     }
 
     public function delete(
$id) {
         if (
$id instanceof CommentInterface) {
             
$id = $id->id;
         }
 
         return 
$this->adapter->delete($this->entityTable,
             "id = 
$id");
     }
 
     protected function createEntity(array 
$row) {
         
$user = $this->userMapper->findById($row["user_id"]);
         return new Comment(
$row["content"]$user);
     }
 }
 
```
 
 
CommentMapper class behaves quite similar to its sibling `PostMapper`. In shortit asks for a user mapper in the constructorso that a specific comment can be tied up to the corresponding commenterConsidering the easy-going nature of `CommentMapper`, let us make a final effort and define another which will handle users:
 
 
### 8. UserMapperInterface.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use ModelUserInterface;
 
 interface UserMapperInterface
 {
     public function findById(
$id);    
     public function findAll(array 
$conditions = array());
     
     public function insert(UserInterface 
$user);
     public function delete(
$id);
 }
 
```
 
 
### 9. UserMapper.php
 
```php
 <?php
 namespace ModelMapper;
 use ModelUserInterface,
     ModelUser;
 
 class UserMapper extends AbstractDataMapper implements UserMapperInterface
 {    
     protected 
$entityTable = "users";
 
     public function insert(UserInterface 
$user) {
         
$user->id = $this->adapter->insert($this->entityTable,
             array("name"  => 
$user->name,
                   "email" => 
$user->email));
         return 
$user->id;
     }
 
     public function delete(
$id) {
         if (
$id instanceof UserInterface) {
             
$id = $id->id;
         }
  
         return 
$this->adapter->delete($this->entityTable,
             array("id = 
$id"));
     }
 
     protected function createEntity(array 
$row) {
         return new User(
$row["name"]$row["email"]);
     }
 }
 
```
 
 
Now that the UserMapper class is setwe have finally reached the goal we were committed to from the very startbuild up from scratch an easy-to-massage mapping layercapable of moving data back and forward between a simplistic blog domain model and MySQLBut let us not pat ourselves in the back yet, as the best way to see if the mappers are as functional as they look at first blush is by example.
 
 
 
 
## Mapping Blogs Domain Objects to and from the DAL
 
 
As you might expectconsuming the blog domain model in an efficient manner is pretty straightforward, as the mappers APIs do the actual hard work and hide the underlying database from the model itselfThis abilitythoughis best appreciated from the application layers perspectiveLet us wire up all the mapper graphs together:
 
 
### 10. Cls_db_test.php
 
```php
 <?php
 use LibraryLoaderAutoloader;
 require_once __DIR__ . "/Autoloader.php";
 
$autoloader = new Autoloader();
 
$autoloader->register();
 
 // create a PDO adapter
 
$adapter = new PdoAdapter("mysql:dbname=blog", "myfancyusername",
     "myhardtoguesspassword");
  
 // create the mappers
 
$userMapper = new UserMapper($adapter);
 
$commentMapper = new CommentMapper($adapter$userMapper);
 
$postMapper = new PostMapper($adapter$commentMapper);
 
```
 
 
So farso goodAt this pointthe mappers have been initialized by dropping their collaborators into the corresponding constructorsConsidering that they are ready to get some real actionnow let us use the post mapper and insert a few trivial posts into the database:
 
 ```
php
 
$postMapper->insert(
     new Post(
         "Welcome to SitePoint",
         "To become yourself a true PHP master, you must first master PHP."));
 
 
$postMapper->insert(
     new Post(
         "Welcome to SitePoint (Reprise)",
         "To become yourself a PHP Master, you must first master... Wait! Did I post that already?"));
 
```
 
 If 
all works as expectedthe `poststable should be nicely populated with the previous entriesButis it just me or do they look a little lonelyLet us fix that add a few comments:
 
 ```
php
 
$user = new User("Everchanging Joe", "joe@example.com");
 
$userMapper->insert($user);
 
 // Joe's comments for the first post (post ID = 1, user ID = 1)
 
$commentMapper->insert(
     new Comment(
         "I just love this post! Looking forward to seeing more of this stuff.",
         
$user),
     1, 
$user->id);
 
 
$commentMapper->insert(
     new Comment(
         "I just changed my mind and dislike this post! Hope not seeing more of this stuff.",
         
$user),
     1, 
$user->id);
 
 // Joe's comment for the second post (post ID = 2, user ID = 1)
 
$commentMapper->insert(
     new Comment(
         "Not quite sure if I like this post or not, so I cannot say anything for now.", 
         
$user),
     2, 
$user->id);
 
```
 
 
Thanks to Joes remarkable eloquencethe first blog post should have now two comments and second should have oneNotice that the foreign keys used to sustain the bound between comments and users have been just picked up at runtimeIn productionhoweverthey most likely should be gathered inside the user interface.
 
 
Now that the blogs database has been finally hydrated with a couple of postscomments, and a chatty users infothe last thing we should do is pull in all the data and dump it on screenHere we go:
 
 
### 11. tbl.php
 
```php
 <?php
 
$posts = $postMapper->findAll();
 
```
 
 
Even when this one-liner is... well just a one-linerit is actually the workhorse that creates blog domain object graphs on request from the database and put them in memory for further processingOn the other handthe graphs in question can be easily decomposed back through a skeletal view, as follows:
 
 ```
html
 <!doctype html>
 <html>
 <head>
  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <title>Building a Domain Model in PHP</title>
 </head>
 <body>
  <header>
   <h1>SitePoint.com</h1>
  </header>
  <section>
   <ul>
 <?php
 foreach (
$posts as $post) {
 ?>
    <li>
     <h2><?php echo 
$post->title;?></h2>
     <p><?php echo 
$post->content;?></p>
 <?php
   if (
$post->comments) {
 ?>
     <ul>  
 <?php
     foreach (
$post->comments as $comment) {
 ?>
      <li>
       <h3><?php echo 
$comment->user->name;?> says:</h3>
       <p><?php echo 
$comment->content;?></p>
      </li>
 <?php
     }
 ?>
     </ul>
 <?php
   }
 ?>
     </li>
 <?php
 }
 ?>
    </ul>
   </section>
  </body>
 </html>
 
```
 
 
 
 
 
### Lazy loading eg Doctrine ORM Proxy, Laravel Eloquent
 
...\fwphp\glomodul\z_examples\02_mvc\domain_m_lazy_load\index.php   
 https
://docs.php.earth/php/ref/oop/design-patterns/lazy-loading/    
 
[lazy-loading]( http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/lazyLoad.html )    
 
 
An object that does not contain all of the data you need but knows how to get it.
 
Software design pattern where the initialization of an object occurs only when it is actually needed and not before to preserve simplicity of usage and improve performance.
 
 
The opposite of lazy loading is eager loading where dataresource, and object is created in the time of the initialization.
 
 
 
### Closing Remarks
 
 
Very few will disagree that the implementation of a rich Domain Model is far away from being an overnighthigh school-like taskeven when using an easy-going language like PHP. While it is safe to say that forwarding model data to and from the DAL can be delegated in many cases to a turnkey mapping library or framework (assuming there exists such a thing), defining the relationships between domain objects, as well as their own rulesdata, and behavior is up to the developer.
 
 
Despite thisthe extra effort in general causes a beneficial wave effect, as it helps out in pushing actively the use of a multi-tier design along with good OOP practices where the involved objects have just a few, [well-defined responsibilities](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_responsibility_principle), and the model doesn't get its pristine ecosystem polluted with database logic. Add to this that shifting the model from one infrastructure to another can be done in a fairly painless fashion, and you'll get to see why this approach is very appealing when developing applications that must scale well.
 
 
 
```
 CREATE TABLE posts (
   id INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   title VARCHAR(100) DEFAULT NULL,
   content TEXT,
 
   PRIMARY KEY (id)
 );
 
 CREATE TABLE users (
   id INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   name VARCHAR(45) DEFAULT NULL,
   email VARCHAR(45) DEFAULT NULL,
 
   PRIMARY KEY (id)
 );
 
 CREATE TABLE comments (
   id INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   content TEXT,
   user_id INTEGER DEFAULT NULL,
   post_id INTEGER DEFAULT NULL,
 
   PRIMARY KEY (id),
   FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES users(id),
   FOREGIN KEY (post_id) REFERENCES posts(id)
 );
 
```
 
 
The above database schema defines a one-to-many relationship between posts and comments, and a one-to-one relationship between comments and users (the blog's commentators). If you're feeling adventurousyou're free to tweak the schema at will to suit your specific needs. For the sake of brevity, however, I've kept it that simple.